Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies Leads to the Master of Occupational Therapy

College of Saint Mary is pleased to offer a unique track for you to become an occupational therapist in 5 years. Enroll in the program via the bachelor degree in rehabilitation studies and move into the master of occupational therapy degree. Field work experiences play a vital role in our curriculum starting in the fourth year.

Board Pass Rates 

The total number of College of Saint Mary master of science in occupational therapy graduates who passed the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) certificate exam from 2011-2013 including first time test taker and repeat test takers is 115 out of 120 graduates, which is an overall pass rate of 96 percent. As of 2014, the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy only posts the overall pass rate of a program regardless of the number of attempts for a student to pass the exam.  The most current information about the board pass rate for CSM is posted by NBCOT. See more information about College of Saint Mary graduation rates and outcomes.   

 

Required Courses in Your Major

Introduction to Occupational Therapy

In this course, you will gain knowledge of the history of occupational therapy and professional organizations related to occupational therapy. You will develop a basic understanding of the occupational therapy terminology, practice settings, and professional documents.

Therapeutic Use of Self

This course focuses on fundamental interpersonal skills of developing the person as an effective agent of change. You will learn skills to build a therapeutic relationship with diverse patients across multiple settings emphasizing professional communication, rapport building and empathy.

Fundamentals of Healthcare and Occupational Therapy

This course is designed to instruct you in basic knowledge concerning healthcare system and delivery. You will have an introduction to health records, ICF and WHO, and understand the healthcare team members and roles.

The Nature of Occupation

This course will introduce you to the concept of occupational science as a discipline that studies the correlation between daily occupations, health and well-being. The power and importance of occupation is emphasized through a thorough investigation into the complex nature of occupation.

Introduction to Theories of Practice

In this course, you will examine select theories, models of practice and frames of reference that have been developed and used in the practice of occupational therapy. This course will establish the foundation for occupational therapy practice and the development of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills.

Principles of Kinesiology

This course focuses on the study of the musculoskeletal system and the principles of human motion. An experiential learning component is integrated into this course and you will learn goniometric and manual muscle testing assessment.

Evaluation and the Occupational Therapy Process

This course is designed to teach you the process of screening, evaluation and referral to determine the need for occupational therapy intervention. You will understand how to select and administer appropriate assessments, interpret the evaluation data and document evaluation results.

Principles of Health Promotion and Education

This course will provide you with the foundation for systematically designing, implementing and evaluating learning experiences used in the education of patients, caregivers, family members and self. Education on instructional design, methods, skills, media and evaluation will be applied to wellness and prevention education with community partners.

Vision, Cognition and Perception in Occupational Therapy

In this course, you will examine the impact of visual, perceptual and cognitive deficits on occupational performance. You will also examine evaluation and intervention methods based on patient context utilizing theoretical constructs.

Clinical Reasoning I

This introductory course will prepare you to be a critical thinker by establishing critical thinking as a method and concept for you to develop, examining how theory and practice are linked, and incorporating knowledge for all level III OT coursework.

Principles of Occupational Therapy Research I

This course will prepare you to use research effectively and enact research ethically. You will begin to critically analyze current research and examine both quantitative and qualitative design focusing on methodology, data analysis and critical discussion of both types of research.

Clinical Reasoning II

This course builds on all OT coursework assisting you to develop as a critical thinker, reflective practitioner and evidence based practitioner. Application and analysis of case studies will be utilized to integrate theory, core OT concepts, therapeutic use of self and the OT process.

Principles of Neuro-Rehabilitation I

In this course, you will learn traditional and contemporary models of practice and evidence-based interventions used in neuro-rehabilitation. You will also implement skills discussed in class through a lab component.

Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics I

In this course, you will explore the development of normal occupations across the age continuum from infancy to adolescence. There is an emphasis on how major developmental theories and occupational therapy frames of references related to pediatric practice guide the selection of assessment tools and in designing patient centered interventions.

Occupational Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation I

In this course, you will focus on the evaluation and treatment of individuals with physical disabilities. Theoretical approaches to OT intervention will be practiced and analyzed. Remedial, compensatory, and adaptive performance approaches will be integrated through intervention education.

Occupational Therapy in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

This course will target the designing, selecting and fabricating of orthotic devices to enhance occupational performance and engagement or re-engagement with meaningful and significant occupations. The course will include a review of upper extremity anatomy as it relates to the correct application and fitting of orthotics and will also introduce the use of prosthetic devices.

Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

In this course, you will focus on the development of theory-driven clinical reasoning in selecting evaluation methods and designing interventions for mental health practice in a variety of settings. You will demonstrate application of group theory and group facilitation skills with patients in a community or hospital setting.

Neuroscience

In this course, you will learn about the organization and function of the nervous system related to movement science, including the foundations of neuroscience, application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to clinical syndromes and behaviors typically seen in the practice of rehabilitation therapies. 

Level IA Fieldwork

In this course, you will learn through participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience. A classroom component will be incorporated to prepare you for the fieldwork experience as well as to offer the opportunity for reflection.

Level IB Fieldwork

This course is designed to enrich your learning through participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience. A classroom component is incorporated to prepare you for the fieldwork experience as well as to offer the opportunity for reflection.

Level IC Fieldwork

This course is designed to enrich your learning experience through participation in selective aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience in an occupational therapy practice setting. You will also discuss preparation and reflection of fieldwork experiences in a seminar format. The Level IC fieldwork experience will emphasize evidence-based practice to support therapeutic interventions.

Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics II

You will examine commonly encountered diagnoses that affect children prenatally through adolescence to understand how these conditions affect occupational performance. Conceptual models for prevention, intervention and team management will also be utilized.

Occupational Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation II

This course is designed to teach evaluation and intervention for complex physical dysfunction including neurological diseases processes and deficits. You will learn entry-level skills necessary to practice in the area of physical rehabilitation.

 

Requirements to Earn Your Bachelor Degree in Rehabilitation Studies and Master in Occupational Therapy

To earn your bachelor of rehabilitation studies degree, you must complete of 160 credit hours:

  • 60 credit hours in undergraduate major courses
  • 40 credit hours in core classes
  • 32 credit hours in graduate courses
  • 6 credit hours in supporting courses
  • 15 credit hours in supporting field courses
  • 7 credit hours in electives

The combined bachelor degree in rehabilitation studies and master degree in occupational therapy requires the above credit hours plus 32 credit hours in graduate level occupational therapy courses for a total of 160 credit hours.

Graduates of the combined program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for occupational therapist, administered by the National Board of Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, you will be an occupational therapist, registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination, attain state licensure or complete fieldwork.

The Assurance of Accreditation

The assurance of regional accreditation means that our degrees have been evaluated for their outcomes — including how well they prepare you to meet the needs of your employers, yourself and our global society.  College of Saint Mary is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

The occupational therapy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, phone 301-652-AOTA. In 2010, College of Saint Mary received a 10-year re-accreditation from ACOTE. This accreditation period is only awarded to programs that are in full compliance with all ACOTE standards, and provides national recognition of our program.

The College of Saint Mary Occupational Therapy Program is a member of the Midwest Fieldwork Consortium. The mission of the consortium is to provide quality fieldwork education experiences. 

Requirements for Admission to College of Saint Mary's Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies/Master of Occupational Therapy Program 

First-time / Full-time Freshman (High School Seniors)

  • Completion of College of Saint Mary admissions requirements
  • Cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • ACT composite score of 21 or above recorded on official high school transcript or SAT report
  • Exemption from or successful completion of the mathematics competency and the English competency examination
  • Satisfactory completion of one year of high school chemistry, one year of high school biology and three years of high school math
  • Ability to comply with the CSM OT Program Functional Expectations
  • Application materials reviewed by program director

 

Transfer or Current CSM Student Admission

  • Completion of College of Saint Mary admissions requirements
  • Current College of Saint Mary students who wish to transfer in may complete an internal application through the registrar's office
  • Official school transcripts from all colleges attended (biology credits more than 5 years old are not accepted)
  • Completion of at least 12 credits required in the Occupational Therapy Program
  • Developmental courses cannot be counted towards fulfillment of this 12 hour requirement
  • Cumulative college quality point average of 3.0 with a minimum grade of C required for successful transfer
  • Successful completion of English and math requirements
  • Ability to comply with the CSM OT Program Functional Expectations
  • Application materials reviewed by program director
  • If you are not a recent high school graduate (within the last 5 years), you must enroll in and successfully complete college courses as indicated in the "Applicant With College Transfer Credit" criteria found in the academic catalog.

 

If you are accepted into the program, you will be notified in writing by the admissions office.

*Please note that there is a limit of 60 students at each level. Meeting the criteria stated above does not guarantee you a spot in the program if there are no slots available.

Progression in the Program

In order to progress from one semester to the next, the student must complete the curriculum in the prescribed sequence. A student who fails an occupational therapy course (those prefixed with OTH) will be required to repeat the course before progressing to the next sequence. The student may repeat only one occupational therapy course (prefixed with OTH). If a student fails two occupational therapy courses, the student is eligible for dismissal and will be considered for dismissal by the occupational therapy policy committee. Failure of a fieldwork experience will be included as a failure. The student must maintain a term GPA of 2.7 starting in level II spring and throughout level III, IV, and V of the occupational therapy program, and earn a grade of C or SA in each occupational therapy course (prefixed with OTH) and BIO 200, 201, 202, 203, PHL 350 and BIO 366. A grade below C is considered failing for undergraduate occupational therapy students. The student must comply with the occupational therapy program policies and ethical standards of the profession. The occupational therapy program reserves the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health and personal suitability for occupational therapy.

 

Academic Description

Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies Leads to the Master of Occupational Therapy

College of Saint Mary is pleased to offer a unique track for you to become an occupational therapist in 5 years. Enroll in the program via the bachelor degree in rehabilitation studies and move into the master of occupational therapy degree. Field work experiences play a vital role in our curriculum starting in the fourth year.

Board Pass Rates 

The total number of College of Saint Mary master of science in occupational therapy graduates who passed the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) certificate exam from 2011-2013 including first time test taker and repeat test takers is 115 out of 120 graduates, which is an overall pass rate of 96 percent. As of 2014, the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy only posts the overall pass rate of a program regardless of the number of attempts for a student to pass the exam.  The most current information about the board pass rate for CSM is posted by NBCOT. See more information about College of Saint Mary graduation rates and outcomes.   

 

Accreditation

The Assurance of Accreditation

The assurance of regional accreditation means that our degrees have been evaluated for their outcomes — including how well they prepare you to meet the needs of your employers, yourself and our global society.  College of Saint Mary is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

The occupational therapy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, phone 301-652-AOTA. In 2010, College of Saint Mary received a 10-year re-accreditation from ACOTE. This accreditation period is only awarded to programs that are in full compliance with all ACOTE standards, and provides national recognition of our program.

The College of Saint Mary Occupational Therapy Program is a member of the Midwest Fieldwork Consortium. The mission of the consortium is to provide quality fieldwork education experiences. 

Admissions Requirements

Requirements for Admission to College of Saint Mary's Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies/Master of Occupational Therapy Program 

First-time / Full-time Freshman (High School Seniors)

  • Completion of College of Saint Mary admissions requirements
  • Cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • ACT composite score of 21 or above recorded on official high school transcript or SAT report
  • Exemption from or successful completion of the mathematics competency and the English competency examination
  • Satisfactory completion of one year of high school chemistry, one year of high school biology and three years of high school math
  • Ability to comply with the CSM OT Program Functional Expectations
  • Application materials reviewed by program director

 

Transfer or Current CSM Student Admission

  • Completion of College of Saint Mary admissions requirements
  • Current College of Saint Mary students who wish to transfer in may complete an internal application through the registrar's office
  • Official school transcripts from all colleges attended (biology credits more than 5 years old are not accepted)
  • Completion of at least 12 credits required in the Occupational Therapy Program
  • Developmental courses cannot be counted towards fulfillment of this 12 hour requirement
  • Cumulative college quality point average of 3.0 with a minimum grade of C required for successful transfer
  • Successful completion of English and math requirements
  • Ability to comply with the CSM OT Program Functional Expectations
  • Application materials reviewed by program director
  • If you are not a recent high school graduate (within the last 5 years), you must enroll in and successfully complete college courses as indicated in the "Applicant With College Transfer Credit" criteria found in the academic catalog.

 

If you are accepted into the program, you will be notified in writing by the admissions office.

*Please note that there is a limit of 60 students at each level. Meeting the criteria stated above does not guarantee you a spot in the program if there are no slots available.

Progression in the Program

In order to progress from one semester to the next, the student must complete the curriculum in the prescribed sequence. A student who fails an occupational therapy course (those prefixed with OTH) will be required to repeat the course before progressing to the next sequence. The student may repeat only one occupational therapy course (prefixed with OTH). If a student fails two occupational therapy courses, the student is eligible for dismissal and will be considered for dismissal by the occupational therapy policy committee. Failure of a fieldwork experience will be included as a failure. The student must maintain a term GPA of 2.7 starting in level II spring and throughout level III, IV, and V of the occupational therapy program, and earn a grade of C or SA in each occupational therapy course (prefixed with OTH) and BIO 200, 201, 202, 203, PHL 350 and BIO 366. A grade below C is considered failing for undergraduate occupational therapy students. The student must comply with the occupational therapy program policies and ethical standards of the profession. The occupational therapy program reserves the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health and personal suitability for occupational therapy.

 

Curriculum

Required Courses in Your Major

Introduction to Occupational Therapy

In this course, you will gain knowledge of the history of occupational therapy and professional organizations related to occupational therapy. You will develop a basic understanding of the occupational therapy terminology, practice settings, and professional documents.

Therapeutic Use of Self

This course focuses on fundamental interpersonal skills of developing the person as an effective agent of change. You will learn skills to build a therapeutic relationship with diverse patients across multiple settings emphasizing professional communication, rapport building and empathy.

Fundamentals of Healthcare and Occupational Therapy

This course is designed to instruct you in basic knowledge concerning healthcare system and delivery. You will have an introduction to health records, ICF and WHO, and understand the healthcare team members and roles.

The Nature of Occupation

This course will introduce you to the concept of occupational science as a discipline that studies the correlation between daily occupations, health and well-being. The power and importance of occupation is emphasized through a thorough investigation into the complex nature of occupation.

Introduction to Theories of Practice

In this course, you will examine select theories, models of practice and frames of reference that have been developed and used in the practice of occupational therapy. This course will establish the foundation for occupational therapy practice and the development of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills.

Principles of Kinesiology

This course focuses on the study of the musculoskeletal system and the principles of human motion. An experiential learning component is integrated into this course and you will learn goniometric and manual muscle testing assessment.

Evaluation and the Occupational Therapy Process

This course is designed to teach you the process of screening, evaluation and referral to determine the need for occupational therapy intervention. You will understand how to select and administer appropriate assessments, interpret the evaluation data and document evaluation results.

Principles of Health Promotion and Education

This course will provide you with the foundation for systematically designing, implementing and evaluating learning experiences used in the education of patients, caregivers, family members and self. Education on instructional design, methods, skills, media and evaluation will be applied to wellness and prevention education with community partners.

Vision, Cognition and Perception in Occupational Therapy

In this course, you will examine the impact of visual, perceptual and cognitive deficits on occupational performance. You will also examine evaluation and intervention methods based on patient context utilizing theoretical constructs.

Clinical Reasoning I

This introductory course will prepare you to be a critical thinker by establishing critical thinking as a method and concept for you to develop, examining how theory and practice are linked, and incorporating knowledge for all level III OT coursework.

Principles of Occupational Therapy Research I

This course will prepare you to use research effectively and enact research ethically. You will begin to critically analyze current research and examine both quantitative and qualitative design focusing on methodology, data analysis and critical discussion of both types of research.

Clinical Reasoning II

This course builds on all OT coursework assisting you to develop as a critical thinker, reflective practitioner and evidence based practitioner. Application and analysis of case studies will be utilized to integrate theory, core OT concepts, therapeutic use of self and the OT process.

Principles of Neuro-Rehabilitation I

In this course, you will learn traditional and contemporary models of practice and evidence-based interventions used in neuro-rehabilitation. You will also implement skills discussed in class through a lab component.

Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics I

In this course, you will explore the development of normal occupations across the age continuum from infancy to adolescence. There is an emphasis on how major developmental theories and occupational therapy frames of references related to pediatric practice guide the selection of assessment tools and in designing patient centered interventions.

Occupational Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation I

In this course, you will focus on the evaluation and treatment of individuals with physical disabilities. Theoretical approaches to OT intervention will be practiced and analyzed. Remedial, compensatory, and adaptive performance approaches will be integrated through intervention education.

Occupational Therapy in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

This course will target the designing, selecting and fabricating of orthotic devices to enhance occupational performance and engagement or re-engagement with meaningful and significant occupations. The course will include a review of upper extremity anatomy as it relates to the correct application and fitting of orthotics and will also introduce the use of prosthetic devices.

Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

In this course, you will focus on the development of theory-driven clinical reasoning in selecting evaluation methods and designing interventions for mental health practice in a variety of settings. You will demonstrate application of group theory and group facilitation skills with patients in a community or hospital setting.

Neuroscience

In this course, you will learn about the organization and function of the nervous system related to movement science, including the foundations of neuroscience, application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to clinical syndromes and behaviors typically seen in the practice of rehabilitation therapies. 

Level IA Fieldwork

In this course, you will learn through participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience. A classroom component will be incorporated to prepare you for the fieldwork experience as well as to offer the opportunity for reflection.

Level IB Fieldwork

This course is designed to enrich your learning through participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience. A classroom component is incorporated to prepare you for the fieldwork experience as well as to offer the opportunity for reflection.

Level IC Fieldwork

This course is designed to enrich your learning experience through participation in selective aspects of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40-hour fieldwork experience in an occupational therapy practice setting. You will also discuss preparation and reflection of fieldwork experiences in a seminar format. The Level IC fieldwork experience will emphasize evidence-based practice to support therapeutic interventions.

Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics II

You will examine commonly encountered diagnoses that affect children prenatally through adolescence to understand how these conditions affect occupational performance. Conceptual models for prevention, intervention and team management will also be utilized.

Occupational Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation II

This course is designed to teach evaluation and intervention for complex physical dysfunction including neurological diseases processes and deficits. You will learn entry-level skills necessary to practice in the area of physical rehabilitation.

 

Degree Requirements

Requirements to Earn Your Bachelor Degree in Rehabilitation Studies and Master in Occupational Therapy

To earn your bachelor of rehabilitation studies degree, you must complete of 160 credit hours:

  • 60 credit hours in undergraduate major courses
  • 40 credit hours in core classes
  • 32 credit hours in graduate courses
  • 6 credit hours in supporting courses
  • 15 credit hours in supporting field courses
  • 7 credit hours in electives

The combined bachelor degree in rehabilitation studies and master degree in occupational therapy requires the above credit hours plus 32 credit hours in graduate level occupational therapy courses for a total of 160 credit hours.

Graduates of the combined program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for occupational therapist, administered by the National Board of Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, you will be an occupational therapist, registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination, attain state licensure or complete fieldwork.